Method Statements Hydrocell

Hydrocell®

is a unique soil improver with remarkable water holding properties. It looks like polystyrene flakes, but mixed into your soil or potting mix, Hydrocell® holds up to 60% of its volume in water. Hydrocell® is suitable for all gardening applications including tree planting, garden beds, lawns, potted plants and roof gardens.

Gardens and Lawns/Beds and Borders
Your garden beds will flourish on less water and suffer less heat stress when you add Hydrocell®. Adding Hydrocell® to existing gardens… Your lawn will flourish on less water and stay green longer with Hydrocell®.

Contact form - lightweight roof gardens

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Hydrocell in planthole gardens 1. wet the bagHydrocell in  gardens 2.Hydrocell in planthole gardens 3Hydrocell in planthole gardens 4Hydrocell in planthole gardens 5Hydrocell in planthole gardens 6 Hydrocell® in plantholes in existing beds
and borders





Turf and Gardens Hydrocell 1Turf and Gardens Hydrocell 2Turf and Gardens Hydrocell 3Turf and Gardens Hydrocell 4 Turf and Gardens Hydrocell 5Hydrocell® for turf and gardens




Beds and Borders Hydrocell step1Beds and Borders Hydrocell step 2Beds and Borders Hydrocell step 3Beds and Borders Hydrocell step 4Beds and Borders Hydrocell step 5Hydrocell® for beds and borders




Hanging baskets with Hydrocell 1Hanging baskets with Hydrocell 2Hanging baskets with Hydrocell 3Hanging baskets with Hydrocell 4Hanging baskets with Hydrocell 5Hanging baskets with Hydrocell 6Hanging baskets with Hydrocell 7 Hydrocell® for hanging baskets





Tree planting with Hydrocell 1Tree planting with Hydrocell 2Tree planting with Hydrocell 3Tree planting with Hydrocell 5Tree planting with Hydrocell 7Hydrocell® for tree planting




Hydrocell in planthole gardens 1. wet the bagHydrocell in planthole gardens 3Hydrocell in planthole gardens 4Hydrocell in planthole gardens 5Hydrocell in planthole gardens 6Hydrocell in planthole gardens 7 Hydrocell® in plantholes











Gardening at high level



  • Laying a roof garden in three steps

    Urbanisation is on the increase. Apartments and parking areas are replacing the green zones. The search for nature seems to be far from home, however the potential in and around our own homes is being somewhat overlooked.


    Proposal for;
    Method Statement for the Construction of the Greenscape Roof Garden System Relating to areas of Turf.

    1. Preparation
    • 1.1 Greenscape will install the Greenscape Roof Garden System once the deck has been waterproofed and insulated (where applicable). A roofing contractor should have carried out this work. We would recommend the use of our partners Icopal for any waterproofing, insulation or cut-to-falls work.

      1.2 The deck should be capable of taking the weight of the roof garden system as well as plants, planters, furniture, people and snow. The client or main contractor should have employed the services of a structural engineer to perform this task.

      1.3 The deck and any associated planters should have sufficient drainage points to drain away surface water and prevent ponding.

      1.4 If applicable, the main contractor should provide a crane, or some other means, to lift roof garden materials, including soil, onto the roof.

      1.5 The site manager should ensure that Greenscape can get access to the site and to the roof. While Greenscape is constructing the roof garden system, there should be no other works on the roof deck. This is particularly the case while bags of soil are being manoeuvred onto the roof.

      1.6 A hosepipe should be made available to Greenscape so that the roof garden system can be watered immediately after installation if required.


    2. Construction Procedure
    • 2.1 The Greenscape Protection Layer, drainage board and Greenscape Filter Fleece are lifted onto the roof.

      2.2 The Greenscape Protection Layer is rolled out and cut to shape, ensuring that drain holes are not covered. When the entire garden space is covered, then the team moves onto the next stage.

      2.3 The drainage board is laid down and cut to shape where needed. Drainage holes are covered with drainage board. Duckboards are used to avoid damage from foot traffic to the drainage board (when applicable). When the entire garden space is covered, then the team moves onto the next stage.

      2.4 The Greenscape Filter Fleece is laid down and cut to shape. Duckboards are used to avoid damage from foot traffic to the drainage board (when applicable). When the entire garden space is covered, then the team moves onto the next stage.

      2.5 A soil mix is laid on top of the Greenscape Filter Fleece. The soil mix is transported by lorry to site in 1 or 2 cubic metre bags. These are lifted onto the roof by a crane or some other device. The bottom of the bag is opened and the soil is poured into position directly from the bag. The soil mix layer is finished off with shovels and rakes. The soil can also be supplied loose and delivered in bulk tippers, if the project allows.

      2.6 The Greenscape workers will move to a skip or transport off site any rubbish produced in the process of building the roof garden system. Paths and areas of decking will be swept and made tidy. All tools and other impedimenta will be removed from the deck.


    3. Note Regarding Insulation
    • 3.1 It is very important to insulate a flat roof where there is a source of winter heat under the roof garden.

      3.2 The capacity for a roof garden to insulate during very cold periods is greatly reduced - particularly if the roof garden system freezes. There can be significant heat loss in very cold temperatures.

      3.3 Any heat making its way into the root zone in winter will "trick" the plants into thinking it is spring. This may encourage new, soft growth, which could be damaged by frost. This could result in the browning-off or even death of the planting.


    4. Note Regarding Safety Wear
    • 4.1 Greenscape workers will wear steel capped boots and hard hats while constructing the Greenscape roof garden system.


    Proposal for;
    Method Statement for the Construction of the Greenscape Roof Garden System.

    1. Preparation
    • 1.1 Greenscape will install the Greenscape Roof Garden System once the deck has been waterproofed and insulated (upside down roof). A roofing contractor should have carried out this work.

      1.2 The deck should be capable of taking the weight of the roof garden system as well as plants, planters, furniture, people and snow. The client or main contractor should have employed the services of a structural engineer to perform this task.

      1.3 The deck and any associated planters should have sufficient drainage points to drain away surface water and prevent ponding.

      1.4 The main contractor should provide a crane, or some other means, to lift roof garden materials, including soil, onto the roof.

      1.5 The site manager should ensure that Greenscape can get access to the site and to the roof. While Greenscape is constructing the roof garden system, there should be no other works on the roof deck. This is particularly the case while bags of soil are being manoeuvred onto the roof.

      1.6 A hosepipe should be made available to Greenscape so that the roof garden system can be watered immediately after installation.


    2. Construction Procedure
    • 2.1 The Greenscape protection sheet, drainage board and Greenscape Filter Fleece are lifted onto the roof.
      2.2 The protection sheet is rolled out and cut to shape, ensuring that drain holes are not covered. When the entire garden space is covered, then the team moves onto the next stage.
      2.3 The drainage board is laid down and cut to shape where needed. Drainage holes are covered with drainage board. Where applicable, duckboards are used to avoid damage from foot traffic to the drainage board. When the entire garden space is covered, then the team moves onto the next stage.
      2.4 The Greenscape Filter Fleece is laid down and cut to shape. Duckboards are used to avoid damage from foot traffic to the drainage board, where applicable. When the entire garden space is covered, then the team moves onto the next stage.
      2.5 The Hydrocell installation phase begins. Hydrocell may be laid down using prefabricated slabs, or it can be made on-site and applied directly to the roof - this is the preferred procedure for larger roof spaces.
      2.6 When prefabricated slabs of Hydrocell are used, then the procedure is as follows. The slabs must be lifted onto the roof using a crane or some other lifting device. The slabs are laid down in the same fashion as the drainage board. Duckboards are used to avoid damage from foot traffic to the newly laid Hydrocell. When the entire planting space is covered, then the team moves onto the next stage.
      2.7 When Hydrocell is manufactured on-site, then the procedure is as follows. Hydrocell is made by mixing a proprietary aminoplast resin with hardener and air to form a hardfoam water retentive substrate. This is normally done using equipment and tanks permanently housed in a lorry and dispensed onto the roof via flexible 2" pipes (another method involves lifting the foaming equipment, resin and hardener tanks onto the roof). The end of the pipe is held by a Greenscape employee who directs the stream of hardfoam to cover the planting area of the roof. The foam begins to harden as it leaves the pipe. A device like a ski pole is used to check that the layer of hardfoam on the deck approximates an average depth of 100mm. Duckboards are used to avoid damage from foot traffic to the newly laid Hydrocell. When the entire garden space is covered, then the team moves onto the next stage.
      2.8 The Hydrocell is saturated with water using a hosepipe. Duckboards are used.
      2.9 Those sections of the planting area that will accommodate larger plants and trees are covered with a root anchor material. Duckboards are used. When the appropriate planting area is covered, then the team moves onto the next stage.
      2.10 A soil mix is laid on top of the Hydrocell / root anchor layer. The depth of soil mix is determined by the planting type. For example, a tree will be planted in more soil mix than shrubs. The soil mix is transported by lorry to site in 1 or 2 cubic metre bags. These are lifted onto the roof by a crane or some other device. The bottom of the bag is opened and the soil is poured into position directly from the bag. The soil mix layer is finished off with shovels and rakes.
      Note: when the Hydrocell is manufactured on-site, then the hardfoam must be left to harden before any soil is applied to the Fytocell layer.
      2.11 The Greenscape workers will move to a skip or transport off site any rubbish produced in the process of building the roof garden system. Paths and areas of decking will be swept and made tidy. All tools and other impedimenta will be removed from the deck.


    3. Note Regarding Insulation
    • 3.1 It is very important to insulate a flat roof where there is a source of winter heat under the roof garden.
      3.2 The capacity for a roof garden to insulate during very cold periods is greatly reduced - particularly if the roof garden system freezes. There can be significant heat loss in very cold temperatures.
      3.3 Any heat making its way into the root zone in winter will "trick" the plants into thinking it is spring. This may encourage plants to put out new shoots, which could be damaged by frost. This could result in the browning-off or even death of the planting.


    4. Note Regarding Safety Wear
    • 4.1 Greenscape workers will wear steel capped boots and hard hats while constructing the Greenscape roof garden system.